5 Tips on getting your blog noticed (written by Millionaire’s Digest)

Overview: Write awesome, engaging headlines. Incorporate relevant stories. Format your content to make it scannable Use visuals. Give something valuable away for free.

via Can’t Get Your Blog Noticed…? Than Here’s What Will (4 min read) — Millionaire’s Digest

Intersting article…

Shamim Sobhani

Why Should you aim for financial freedom? Alexis Esguerr

Written By Millionaire’s Digest Team Member: Alexis Esguerra Founder & Owner of: Business and Beyond Millionaire’s Digest Team, Contributor and Business Writer Have you read, watched or heard of the word financial freedom? If you do, then I assume you have watched one or a couple of videos used by multi-level marketing firms or organizations or have […]

via Why Should you Aim for Financial Freedom? (1 min read) — Millionaire’s Digest

Shamim Sobhani

A cool and categorized reading list by Hannah Brencher

HEY YOU! Today is Thursday and I am currently mourning over the fact that all my friends in Connecticut have a Snow Day (yes, proper noun in my world) and I’m stuck dealing with Atlanta’s indecisive weather patterns. In the spirit of Snow Days (and me not getting any), I am working until 2pm and then cuddling […]

via The Unofficial (but so official) Reading List for 2017 — hannah brencher

Shamim Sobhani

A Discourse on Coffee Break

A Discourse on Coffee Break

In a follow-up to my latest post From Canada to Europe. Reflections of an expat, I wanted to share an anecdote about a cultural experience. Have you ever found yourself in a situation where you weren’t sure how to act? Living in Spain, I’ve witnessed that Spanish people appreciate time spent with friends. It’s appreciated even more when you’re a foreigner and you try to include yourself in social gatherings. It shows that you care about getting to know them. In my case it hasn’t been any different. I work at a job in Spain where my co-workers appreciate it when I spend my coffee break with them, especially if they invite me. It’s almost a rule of thumb to not refuse an offer like that. “Coffee break” isn’t limited to coffee only. It’s more about drinking something or having a snack with them. To me this means that the Spanish value “people” time. Coffee breaks also provide a space for building and strengthening relationships. I’m all for that. However, I’ve come to face a small dilemma: I’m a busy body and have recently been working on several projects simultaneously (and I enjoy all of them), and so I like to take advantage of the little free time I have and work on them during my breaks. This doesn’t mean that I don’t like spending time with my co-workers; it just means that I like to be efficient. This is a difference I’ve noticed between the Canadian/American culture and the Spanish culture. I’m aware that my co-workers may notice when I´m not around during our breaks, so I thought a temporary solution would be to divide my free time or coffee breaks between my co-workers and my projects. I also thought of getting more data so that I could be around my co-workers while working on my cell phone instead of having to use a computer in a separate office. I wouldn’t want to push anyone’s sensitive button! Is there anyone out there who feels like there could be a better solution? Do you agree with me? Your opinions are welcome!

Singing off –

Shamim Sobhani

 

The featured image is courtesy of Daria Nepriakhina.

From Canada to Europe. Reflections of an expat

From Canada to Europe. Reflections of an expat

I’m a Canadian expat living in Madrid, Spain. Yes, I left Canada to live in Spain, but don’t get me wrong, I’m fond of Canada. Who doesn’t enjoy the benefits of free health care? Spain has it too, though. Canada has great people, and so does Spain. Are you catching onto my point? If not – both countries are cool. Despite the similarities, they are different countries, and within that umbrella comes an array of different cultures. Sometimes the differences in the Spanish culture shine through like the sun, positively speaking, and other times it makes me ask myself if I belong here. I’m not a newcomer, so I have learned some things here and there, but there’s always room to learn more! It’s like a journey. The question of integration always pops up; it never seizes to prove its importance.

Are you an expat and have faced interesting experiences dealing with the culture of your second home? Share them please!

Signing off –

Shamim Sobhani